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2 edition of Water relations, growth and survival of root-wrenched Douglas-fir seedlings found in the catalog.

Water relations, growth and survival of root-wrenched Douglas-fir seedlings

Mary L. Duryea

Water relations, growth and survival of root-wrenched Douglas-fir seedlings

  • 217 Want to read
  • 2 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Douglas fir.,
  • Roots (Botany).

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Mary Louise Duryea.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[7] 40 leaves, bound :
    Number of Pages40
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14213929M

    these seedlings is vital to their survival. To keep these seedlings cool and moist, you should: Transport in a covered, well-ventilated vehicle. Avoid exposure to direct sunlight. Store in a cool or refrigerated area 33°F (ideal) to 36°F (maximum). The way you handle these seedlings is vital to their survival. 13' x 13' = trees per acre.   Phosphorus and potassium are the two main nutrients that support root growth in plants. Specifically, they encourage plants to put down a dense collection of new roots and strengthen existing. Douglas-fir comprises about 50 percent of the standing timber in the western forests. It produces more timber than any other American species. Trees in virgin forests average to feet in height and 4 to 6 feet in diameter. Under favorable conditions, trees 10 years of age may be 12 to 15 feet in height and 1 to 2 inches in diameter. species. Early, rapid root growth and branching were suggested to confer an adaptive advantage in more efficient use of soil water. Root elongation can be advantageous to plants in drying soil, and may be particularly important for seedling establishment. Growth of new plants is restricted largely to surface soil layers that are vulnerable.


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Water relations, growth and survival of root-wrenched Douglas-fir seedlings by Mary L. Duryea Download PDF EPUB FB2

Root wrenching in the nursery was investigated in relation to Douglas-fir (Pseudotsugamenziesii (Mirb.)Franco) seedling growth and survival under field conditions. Immediately after wrenching, seedlings had lower plant water potential and leaf conductance of water vapor than unwrenched by: In no case did root wrenching improve field height growth or survival after one year, and among four of the sources shoot growth was significantly less than that of unwrenched seedlings.

Chapter 2 Water Relations of Root-wrenched Douglas-fir Seedlings Root wrenching was investigated as a nursery practice to precondition Douglas-fir seedlings to Cited by: Water relations, growth and survival of root-wrenched Douglas-fir seedlings / Article in Canadian Journal of Forest Research 12(3) February with 17 Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Title: WATER RELATIONS, GROWTH AND SURVIVAL OF ROOT-WRENCHED DOUGLAS-FIR SEEDLINGS Abs tract Approved: Denis P. Lavender Chapter 1 Growth and Survival of Root-Wrenched Douglas-fir Seedlings Root wrenching of seedlings (severing the roots 15 cm below the soil surface) was investigated as a nursery practice to improve growth.

In no case did root wrenching improve field\ud height growth or survival after one year, and among four of the sources shoot growth was significantly less than that of unwrenched seedlings. Chapter 2 Water Relations of Root-wrenched Douglas-fir Seedlings Root wrenching was investigated as a nursery practice to precondition Douglas-fir seedlings.

The highest survival rates, regardless of treatment, were exhibited by Douglas-fir. Approximately 72% and 82% of untreated seedlings, planted in and respectively, survived. Survival of seedlings that received treatment ranged from 81% to 95%.

Douglas-fir seedlings were able to survive and grow because they were highly drought tolerant. Douglas-Fir Seedling Grows 8 Feet Tall in Two Seasons Donald Copes, Frank Sorensen, and Roy Silen ABSTRACT.-A inch-tall coastal Douglas-ir (Pseudo­ tsuga menziesii [Mirb.]Franco) seedling was grown from seed in two years.

Greenhouse temperatures of 60° to 70° F, a six-month growing season, long day, adequate. Introduction. Douglas Fir, Pseudotsuga menziesii, is from the family Pinaceae it is an evergreen conifer also called the Oregon Pine because it is native to the northwestern United States can be found all around that region and can grow to feet tall; it is the second tallest growing conifer after the coast redwood.

Douglas firs can live for hundreds of years this is due to its. This experiment evaluated the influence of manure, peat, and vermiculite incorporated at low and high rates ( and m3/m2) and under two soil moisture regimes on Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) seedling (1+0 for 1+1) xylem water potential (Ψxylem), whole-plant growth, root architectural development, and subsequent field performance under fertilized and non.

Forest Ecology and Management, 60 () Elsevier Science Publishers B.V., Amsterdam Field survival and early height growth of Douglas- fir rooted cuttings: relationship to stem diameter and root system quality Gary A.

Ritchiea'*, Yasuomi Tanakaa, Rod Meadea, Steven D. Dukeb a Weyerhaeuser Company, G.R. Staebler Forest Resources Research Center, North. Culturing strategies that improve bud development and cold hardiness of Douglas-fir seedlings. In Woody plant growth in a changing chemical D.P.

Water relations, growth, and survival of root-wrenched Douglas-fir seedlings. Can. Paclobutrazol and triadimefon effects on conifer seedling growth and water relations.

Can. The performance (survival and growth) of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii Mirb. Franco.) seedlings planted in minimally disturbed, scalped, and bedded soils, both with and without herbicidal. The effects of light, brush control, and simulated herbivory on the growth and survival of planted western redcedar and Douglas-fir were investigated under variable overstory retention; a factorial combination of two spatial patterns (aggregated vs.

dispersed) and two retention densities (25 and 49 trees per ha) was used to vary light. Besides Douglas fir, other possible names include Doug-fir, false spruce, red fir, Oregon pine, Douglas pine, yellow fir, and Douglas spruce. Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii is the coast Douglas fir.

Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca may be called either the interior Douglas fir or the Rocky Mountain Douglas fir. We tested effects of shortened day length during nursery culture on Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var.

menziesii (Mirb.)Franco) seedling development at dormancy release. Seedlings from a 42°N source were grown either under ambient photoperiods (long-day (LD)) or with a 28 day period of 9 h light: 15 h dark photoperiods (short-day (SD)).

How to Germinate Douglas Fir Seeds. The coast redwood is the world's tallest tree, but the coast Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) is a close second, with the tallest specimens reaching heights.

A report on how the application of specific plant growth regulators (PGRs) and a moisture retention gel to the root systems of Douglas-fir can influence root indoleacetic acid (IAA) content, and tree growth and survival 10 years after planting in a clearcut.

Root pruning of trees in fruit, forest and landscape tree nurseries is an old and varied practice (11). It has been used as a horticultural tool to produce a sturdier tree, force development of a more compact, fibrous root system, retard top growth and increase transplant survival and post- transplant growth (14).

Mortality increases steadily in Douglas-fir stands to years old but spread is slower in older stands and it takes many decades for the large old trees to be killed by the fungus.

This is the most serious disease of older Douglas-fir and true fir. Douglas-fir, mountain hemlock, grand fir and white fir are the most susceptible. Forest Ecology and Management, 18 () Elsevier Science Publishers B.V., Amsterdam -- Printed in The Netherlands Effect of Shading, Mulching and Vegetation Control on Douglas-Fir Seedling Growth and Soil Water Supply L.E.

FLINT and S.W. CHILDS Department of Soil Science, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (U.S.A.) (Accepted 1 August ). Water relations, growth and survival of root wrenched Douglas-fir seedlings.

Canadian Journal of Forest Research. Glass, G. The effects of rootraking on an upland Piedmont loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) site. Tech. Rep. Raleigh, NC: North Carolina State Forest Fertilization Cooperative.

44 p. Water relations, growth,and survival of root wrenched Douglas fir seedlings. Canadian Journal of Forest Research Kuhns, L.J. How to control weeds - the basics and the herbicides.

American Nurseryman (5): Mason, WL. and D.R. Williamson. Recent research in. Douglas-fir provide a significant winter food of the blue grouse.

water the plants with a deep, thorough soaking and let the plants dry in between watering. Thin the plants down to one per around the plants to encourage better survival and growth rate. Make sure a protective barrier is placed. Growth of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud. var. latifolia Engelm.) seedlings after two growing seasons was reduced by medium and high levels of compaction in loamy sand and silt loam soils that received one of three compaction treatments (low= relative bulk density [RBD], medium RBD, and high RBD).

Survival was reduced on the loamy sand, but not on the silt. Introduction. Ectomycorrhizal networks (MNs) have been shown to affect seedling water budgets, but the precise nature and mechanisms underlying these effects are ambiguous (Warren et al. ).Large trees have been shown to play a role in redistributing water to interior Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga ) seedlings establishing nearby, and that this is influenced by the presence of.

tom) in old-growth Douglas-fir trees and from a single canopy po-sition in the 1 m tall, understory Pacific silver fir. For J 27, 29 and August 2, water potential and stomatal conductance were measured on the exposed, sapling-sized Douglas-fir trees.

For water potential readings, branchlets were removed with a. Progress 01/01/94 to 12/30/94 Outputs--Boron Toxicity in Douglas-fir Seedlings. This was a preliminary study to test the effects of high levels of boron on Douglas-fir growth. The toxic limits of boron appear to be higher than expected.

--Methyl bromide. A study is in progress to study alternatives to methyl bromide use in forest nursery soils. Douglas-fir seedlings also received carbon, nutrients and water transferred from nearby trees (Schoonmaker et al.Teste et al.

), although the benefits appear to be reduced in the presence of root competition (Bingham and SimardSong et al. From the left, the first and third trees received supplemental irrigation while the second and fourth did not. Note the differences in where the roots are. Source: Chan et al Effects of contrasting light and soil moisture availability on the growth and biomass allocation of Douglas-fir and red alder.

Can. For. Res. 33(1): – Water relations, growth, and survival of root-wrenched Douglas-fir seedlings. Canadian Journal of Forest Research Edwards, D. Improving seed germination in Abi es. In: Th International Plan t Propaga ors' Society Combined Proceedings 31(): Eyre, F.

H., ed. Forest cover types of the United States and Canada. layer beneath the transplanted root system of Douglas-fir seedlings on (9 growth rates, (ii) root architectural develop- ment in relation to the proximity of the fertilizer layer, and (iii) chlorophyll fluorescence.

Materials and methods Plant material Douglas-fx seeds (seedlot No. The study, published Aug. 8 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, provides direct evidence of the negative impact of water stress on forest ecosystems.

It also pinpointed which conditions are causing low growth among Douglas fir trees. Stands with Douglas-fir trees over l years old are occasionally encountered, however (Hemstrom and Franklin ). Senescence may appear in some old-gowth forests, although it appears that old-growth stands of Douglas-fir typically remain intact for to years.

On the other hand, some stands may break up at years, while others. Survival, growth, and stem volume were determined for 2+0 ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) seedlings after 8 growing seasons.

For each species, seedlings from three seedlots were assigned to one of three root-volume categories [7 cm 3 (RV3) for ponderosa pine.

Changes in the water content of tree tissues were measured by a number of workers in the s, s and s, but water storage in stems (sapwood) in large trees seems to have been first identified as a significant factor in the seasonal water relations and water balance of conifers by Waring and Running () and Waring et al.

The. Early developmental stages of plants are expected to be a major bottleneck to recruitment. Information on the response of seedling to anticipated water availability is urgently needed in regions where tree seedlings may experience more frequent water deficits.

In this paper, we focused on the influence of water deficit on different species (larch vs. birch) and origins (xeric vs. mesic). Douglas fir seedlings (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) study with 4 species, Schantz-Hansen () found Franco.) were planted with three root form treatments no significant differences in survival or root de including C-roots ("correctly" planted controls), velopment between planting methods, including a L-roots, and ]-roots.

seedlings. The objectives of this study were to quantitatively assess the effects of a wide range of CRF rates applied as a single layer beneath the transplanted root system of Douglas-fir seedlings on (i) growth rates, (ii) root architectural develop-ment in relation to the proximity of the fertilizer layer, and (iii) chlorophyll fluorescence.

Growth of Douglas-fir, ponderosa pine, and western larch seedlings following seed treatment with 30 percent hydrogen peroxide by Edgren, James W., ; Trappe, James M; Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.).

Growth and survival of P. sylvestris seedlings after 2 years of growth in a nursery with untreated soil and soil amended with pine litter or oak litter a Tukey's HSD test showed significant differences in the concentrations of C, K, Ca, Mn, and Al between seedlings grown in.

survival of undercut or root-wrenched loblolly pine seedlings especially on droughty sites is also due to improved water relations after planting. Mineral nutrition. Wrenching has been found to reduce the foliar concentrations of N, P, and K in radiata pine (Benson and Sheperd ) and Douglas-fir (Menzies ).

This same response could.The influence of containerized stock type on the growth and survival of Douglas-fir seedlings. Tree Planter Notes C.A.

Gonzalez-Benecke, H.N. Flamenco and M.G. Wightman. Effect of Vegetation Management and Site Conditions on Volume, Biomass and Leaf Area Allometry of Four Coniferous Species in the Pacific Northwest United States.Drought conditions slow the growth of Douglas fir trees across the West: Nearly a century of growth rates suggest climate change will further stress Douglas firs in coming decades.

ScienceDaily.